Hail DamageClient’s in six states place their crop insurance needs with Crop Revenue Management. Thanks to innovative decision aid tools like the Crop Revenue Evaluator, clients can go to a single source to manage crop revenue.

Two types of crop insurance are available to farmers in the United States: Private Products and Multiple Peril Crop Insurance (MPCI).1

Private Products

Private Product policies are not part of the Federal Crop Insurance Program and are provided directly to farmers by private insurers.  A popular example is Crop-Hail. Many farmers purchase Crop-Hail coverage because hail has the unique ability to totally destroy a significant part of a planted field while leaving the rest undamaged. In areas of the country where hail is a frequent event, farmers often purchase a Crop-Hail policy to protect high-yielding crops. Unlike MPCI, a Crop-Hail policy can be purchased at any time during the growing season.

Other new products available privately include, but not limited to: Total Weather, additional replant coverage, pre-pricing the MPCI Spring Price prior to the discovery period to name a few.  These examples are products that need to be purchased on or before the MPCI sales closing date.

Multiple Peril Crop Insurance (MPCI)

MPCI policies must be purchased prior to planting and cover loss of crop yields from all types of natural causes including drought, excessive moisture, freeze, and disease. Newer coverage options combine yield protection and price protection to guard farmers against potential loss in revenue, whether due to low yields or changes in market price.

Under the Federal Crop Insurance Program’s unique public-private partnership, there are currently 17 private companies authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture Risk Management Agency (USDA RMA) to write MPCI policies. The service delivery side of the program — writing and reinsuring the policies, marketing, adjusting and processing claims, training and record-keeping, etc. — is handled by each private company. The program is overseen and regulated by the Risk Management Agency (RMA). The RMA sets the rates that can be charged and determines which crops can be insured in different parts of the country. The private companies are obligated to sell insurance to every eligible farmer who requests it and retains a large portion of the risk on over 80 percent of the policies written.

The federal government also subsidizes the farmer-paid premiums to reduce the cost to farmers. In addition, it provides reimbursement to the private insurance companies to offset operating and administrative costs that would otherwise be paid by farmers as part of their premium. Through this federal support, crop insurance remains affordable to a majority of America’s farmers and ranchers.

By combining the regulatory authority and financial support of the federal government with the efficiencies of the private sector, the crop insurance program has succeeded in meeting and even surpassing the goals set forth by Congress for broad participation, diversity and inclusion. By using the private sector, risk is shared among the private companies as well as the government.

1 Copyright © 2013 National Crop Insurance Services